In the first session of this second week, presenters will walk through applying the NIOSH Occupational Exposure Banding e-Tool using the example provided for participant practice at the end of week one.

You will also get a chance to share your experiences using the Tier 1 e-Tool and ask questions. Presenters will then do a deep dive into NIOSH Tier 2 Occupational Exposure Banding and evaluation processes.

The second and third sessions will focus on the Tier 2 OEB e-Tool Demonstration using several examples. You will be given your own example to work with after the third session for additional practice using the tool.

AGENDA

DateTimeSession NamePresenter(s)Contact Hours
March 10, 2020;
Tuesday
1:00-2:30 pm
eastern time
NIOSH Tier 2 Occupational Exposure Banding OverviewT.J. Lentz1.5
March 11, 2020;
Wednesday
1:00-2:00 pm
eastern time
NIOSH Tier 2 OEB e-Tool Part 1 T.J. Lentz, Melissa Seaton, Steve Gilbert & Chris Whittaker1
March 12, 2020;
Thursday
1:00-2:00 pm
eastern time
NIOSH Tier 2 OEB e-Tool Part 2Lauralynn McKernan, Melissa Seaton, Steve Gilbert & Chris Whittaker 1

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Upon completion, you will be able to:

  • Develop an OEB using the NIOSH occupational exposure banding Tier 2 methodology.
  • Interpret OEBs and the limitations of their application in the workplace.
  • Explain the differences in interpreting data for the nine health endpoints used in OEB derivation.

SPEAKERS

Stephen Gilbert, MS
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH

Steve Gilbert is a statistician in the Risk Evaluation Branch within the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). He has worked in risk assessment at NIOSH for more than 25 years. Mr. Gilbert earned his B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics and M.S. in Statistics from Miami University (Ohio). He has been involved in many different risk assessment projects such as noise induced hearing loss, asbestos mortality and lung disease, trends in occupational fatal injury rates along with years of potential life lost from fatal injuries, silica and lung disease, 1.3-butadiene cancer risk, diacetyl and 2,3-pentanedione lung impairment, and most recently Occupational Exposure Banding.


Thomas J. Lentz, PhD
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH

T.J. Lentz is a lead health scientist/research occupational hygienist and Chief of the Science Applications Branch with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (NIOSH/CDC). Dr. Lentz conducts research to evaluate occupational and environmental hazards, with projects and interests that include: investigation of small business industries and their hazards; assessment of safety hazards in construction trades; and evaluation of toxicology and epidemiology data on chemical and physical agents to determine health risks and appropriate prevention strategies. Dr. Lentz is particularly interested in studying how design, planning, and control engineering can be used to address safety and health challenges in the work environment. Major duties include developing informational materials and guidance for other agencies, industry, labor groups, and the public. Dr. Lentz previously served as the Policy Response Coordinator for the Institute. Dr. Lentz earned a B.A. in biology/philosophy from Wittenberg University (1989), an M.P.H. in environmental health sciences/health policy from Yale University (1991), and a Ph.D. in environmental health/industrial hygiene from the University of Cincinnati (1997).

Lauralynn Taylor McKernan, ScD, CIH
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH

Captain Lauralynn Taylor McKernan is an environmental health officer in the US Public Health Service and has been working as a research industrial hygienist for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for 20 years. She is a certified industrial hygienist and received her Doctor of Science degree from Harvard University. Dr. McKernan has conducted a variety of industrial hygiene field studies and has publications in topics ranging from bio-aerosols on commercial aircraft, blood lead monitoring techniques, risk probability, diacetyl sampling, and lessons learned for first responders. Dr. McKernan is a subject matter expert in occupational exposure banding and has been a valued team member for the NIOSH Occupational Exposure Banding Initiative since 2013. Dr. McKernan is the past chair for the American Industrial Hygiene Association Exposure and Control Banding Committee.

Melissa Seaton, MS, CIH
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH

Lieutenant Melissa Seaton is an industrial hygienist at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and an environmental health officer in the US Public Health Service. LT Seaton has earned a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Michigan and a M.S. in Environmental Health from the Harvard School of Public Health, where she specialized in Occupational Hygiene and Hazardous Substances. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, where her research focuses on mathematical models for workplace exposures. At NIOSH, LT Seaton has been involved in several projects, including the development of the NIOSH Occupational Exposure Banding methodology, the development of a high priority Criteria for a Recommended Standard document, and multiple health hazard evaluations. LT Seaton has also been involved in emergency preparedness and response. She has deployed 3 times in support of the CDC Ebola Response, including 2 deployments to Sierra Leone, West Africa.

Christine Whittaker, PhD
National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH

Dr. Christine Whittaker received her B.S. in Biology from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and her Ph.D. in Environmental Toxicology from the University of California Irvine. From 1990 to 1997, Chris worked in the Directorate of Health Standards in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in Washington DC, where she conducted occupational risk assessment to support chemical regulations. In 1997, Chris moved to the NIOSH Office of the Director in Washington, DC, where she served as a senior scientist. In 2004, she moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, as Chief of the Risk Evaluation Branch in the Division of Science Integration (DSI). Throughout her career, Chris’s focus has been assessing chemical hazards to workers and determining how those hazards can be most effectively mitigated through science policy. In her time in DSI, Chris has been involved in the development of NIOSH science policy, including thinking around the utility and processes in systematic review, the NIOSH Chemical Carcinogen Policy, the NIOSH Practices in Occupational Risk Assessment, the NIOSH Occupational Exposure Banding Process for Chemical Risk Management, as well as several documents on occupational exposure to various workplace chemicals.