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Quick Talk 1

Enterprise Risk Management an​​d Risk Assessment

Enterprise Risk Management and Risk Assessment​ Track

Monday, October 30

10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.


Moderator: Benjamin J. Heckman, MPH, CIH​, Principal, RHP Risk Management Inc.​, Carlisle, PA.

10:30 a.m. - ​11:00 a.m.

Use Less Resources for Better Exposure Risk Assessments

Presenters: Elizabeth Pullen, CIH, FAIHA, Industrial Hygiene Manager, Clariant Corporation, Charlotte, NC; Susan Arnold, PhD, CIH, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

With the trend toward increasing E, H, and S responsibilities, IH practitioners often do not have the time or resources to do extensive exposure risk assessments using the traditional methodologies for every "task/chemical" combination in their facilities. We will discuss methodologies to help bring efficiencies to the exposure risk assessment process, so that the "tasks/chemicals" of moderate-to-high concern are identified and assessed. By using existing site chemical and process information and creating appropriate groupings, the IH can focus on groupings of moderate-to-high concern. For facilities with many chemicals, linking the H&S risk assessment to the Health Hazard Inventory limits time spent documenting each possible "task/chemical" combination. When production plans are uncertain and continually changing, random sampling for groups of chemicals can be an efficient method to collect data, as long as all pertinent data is captured and accessible for future data analysis of the SEG. Documentation can be limited to data that needs to be searchable, with the other pertinent data easily accessible as needed. Involving employees in the risk assessment process helps in identifying the hazards of higher concern and involving them in developing effective control solutions.

11:00 a.m. - 11:3​0 a.m.​​

Use Models and Tools for Better Exposure Risk Assessments

Presenter: Lauralynn McKernan, Sc.D., CIH, Associate Director for Science, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) / DSHEFS, Cincinnati, OH.

With the trend toward increasing E, H, and S responsibilities, IH practitioners often do not have the time or resources to do extensive exposure risk assessments using the traditional methodologies for every "task/chemical" combination in their facilities. For "tasks/chemicals" with Occupational Exposure Limits (OEL), the “Checklist” tool can quickly identify tasks/chemicals warranting further controls. Using a combination of OELs, vapor pressure, and existing ventilation, the tool determines expected exposure levels and recommends the level of ventilation needed to reach a desired exposure level for both particulates and gases/vapors. The AIHA Exposure Assessment Strategy relies on the chemical having an OEL. For some chemicals without OELs, the NIOSH Occupational Exposure Banding process can assign chemicals to bands, and the IH can use that information to focus on the "tasks/chemicals" that warrant further investigation. The output is an occupational exposure band (OEB), which corresponds to a range of exposure concentrations that is expected to be protective of worker health. Not to be confused with “control banding,” which gives guidance on control measures, the proposed NIOSH occupational exposure banding process uses available, but often limited, toxicological data to determine a potential range of exposure levels to guide risk management decisions.​​​​​​​​​​​​

 

 Presenters

 
Name and Bio



Elizabeth Pullen, CIH, FAIHA, Industrial Hygiene Manager, Clariant Corporation, Charlotte, NC.

Elizabeth Pullen, MSPH, CIH, FAIHA has 35 years of experience in comprehensive industrial hygiene practice. She is currently the North American Industrial Hygiene Manager for Clariant Corporation. She provides technical guidance to 30+ plant sites and manages the North American ESH audit program. Elizabeth received her BS in Biology from Tufts University in 1976 and her MSPH in Industrial Hygiene from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1982. She served as President of AIHA from 2011–2012, Chair of Exposure Assessment Strategies Committee in 2002, President of Carolinas Local Section in 1994 and is currently the Past Chair of the Fellows Special Interest Group (SIG). She received the Fellow award in 2007.​



Lauralynn McKernan, (CAPT), ScD, CIH, Associate Director for Science, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH.

Captain Lauralynn Taylor McKernan is an environmental health officer in the U.S. Public Health Service and is the Associate Director for Science in the Division of Surveillance, Hazard Evaluations and Field Studies of NIOSH in Cincinnati, OH. She is a Certified Industrial Hygienist and received her Doctor of Science degree from Harvard University. She has conducted a variety of industrial hygiene field studies and has publications in topics ranging from bioaerosols on commercial aircraft, blood lead monitoring techniques, diacetyl sampling, and lessons learned for first responders. Dr. McKernan has been very active in AIHA activities, previously serving as an officer for the Academy of Industrial Hygiene, as well as Treasurer and a Board of Director for the Ohio Valley Section of AIHA. She is the Past Chair for the AIHA Exposure and Control Banding Committee.​



Susan Arnold, PhD, CIH, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Dr. Susan Arnold is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Environmental Health Sciences, UMN School of Public Health and Director of the Exposure Science & Sustainability Institute. Susan has been an active member of AIHA’s Exposure Assessment Strategies Committee for 20+ years and is a past chair of the EASC and the Modeling Subcommittee (1999 - 2003 Susan is certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial Hygiene. Her interests include occupational exposure and risk assessment, developing, evaluating and applying exposure models, and using novel Bayesian statistical methods incorporating model outputs to develop accurate qualitative (Bayesian prior) exposure judgments and improve professional judgment.​